The Blow has had a relationship with Toronto that stretches back to her early days in the performance art-ish anti-folk K Records Olympia, Washington scene and the concurrent Torontopia era. Now, Khaela Maricich and her bandmate of several years, Melissa Dyne, considers themselves “married” to the city. So they enlisted their friends at Wavelength to help recruit locals to put up their “love notes” around town. If you’ve been walking around, you’ve probably seen one.
We reached out to Khaela to recount her favourite Toronto memories. She more than obliged. Read on for the first date, marriage and consummation.
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The Blow has had a relationship with Toronto that stretches back to her early days in the performance art-ish anti-folk K Records Olympia, Washington scene and the concurrent Torontopia era. Now, Khaela Maricich and her bandmate of several years, Melissa Dyne, considers themselves “married” to the city. So they enlisted their friends at Wavelength to help recruit locals to put up their “love notes” around town. If you’ve been walking around, you’ve probably seen one.

We reached out to Khaela to recount her favourite Toronto memories. She more than obliged. Read on for the first date, marriage and consummation.

READ MORE

JUST REMEMBER ALL CAPS WHEN YOU SPELL THE MAN NAME
Happy 10th anniversary to Madvillain’s Madvillainy

JUST REMEMBER ALL CAPS WHEN YOU SPELL THE MAN NAME

Happy 10th anniversary to Madvillain’s Madvillainy

INTERVIEW: St. Vincent’s Annie Clark on writing her life through performance 
Annie Clark talks about her ambivalent relationship with technology, projecting an archetype, and what it means to be “crushworthy.”

INTERVIEW: St. Vincent’s Annie Clark on writing her life through performance

Annie Clark talks about her ambivalent relationship with technology, projecting an archetype, and what it means to be “crushworthy.”

nprmusic:

Y’all asked for it: More Samuel Herring dance GIFs!

Stream Future Islands’ Singles from NPR Music’s First Listen

GIFs: adamkissick for NPR

NOISEMAKERS: S3E5: Mozart’s Sister plays “Mozart’s Sister” live at a kickboxing gym
Join us in the dojo for a demonstration by Canada’s next DIY pop star.

NOISEMAKERS: S3E5: Mozart’s Sister plays “Mozart’s Sister” live at a kickboxing gym

Join us in the dojo for a demonstration by Canada’s next DIY pop star.

Music fans of a certain age are familiar with that uncanny feeling of standing in the middle of a record store, money in wallet, and having no idea what they want to listen to. Nowadays, you carry that whole record store in your pocket with you at all times, but with so much possibility still the only thing you can think of is “Who Let The Dogs Out?” This generation has a solution: music discovery apps. Specifically designed to get you out of that musical rut, find your new favourite band, even give you something new to hum for a minute. And that’s great. If you’re stuck, why not get your friend (or a friendly algorithm approximating the taste a friend) to help you out?
But here’s the thing: we’re music writers, not tech writers. We’ve heard every single released as a lyric video on YouTube this morning, every album hitting stores next week, and can tell you the three obscure krautrock records they’re ripping off. Our inboxes are bursting with music one-sheets we’ll never read. We burned our tongues because we wanted to sip the coffee before it was cool. But hey, that also makes us the best people to test the leading music discovery apps. What can we discover from these apps that we haven’t already heard, posted, and called “atmospheric”? Will these offer us anything new? And will we keep them when we’re done?
So we put them to the test the best way we knew how as citizens of the smart phone age: we gave them each two minutes of our time to see if we could discover anything new. Here’s how they fared:

Music fans of a certain age are familiar with that uncanny feeling of standing in the middle of a record store, money in wallet, and having no idea what they want to listen to. Nowadays, you carry that whole record store in your pocket with you at all times, but with so much possibility still the only thing you can think of is “Who Let The Dogs Out?” This generation has a solution: music discovery apps. Specifically designed to get you out of that musical rut, find your new favourite band, even give you something new to hum for a minute. And that’s great. If you’re stuck, why not get your friend (or a friendly algorithm approximating the taste a friend) to help you out?

But here’s the thing: we’re music writers, not tech writers. We’ve heard every single released as a lyric video on YouTube this morning, every album hitting stores next week, and can tell you the three obscure krautrock records they’re ripping off. Our inboxes are bursting with music one-sheets we’ll never read. We burned our tongues because we wanted to sip the coffee before it was cool. But hey, that also makes us the best people to test the leading music discovery apps. What can we discover from these apps that we haven’t already heard, posted, and called “atmospheric”? Will these offer us anything new? And will we keep them when we’re done?

So we put them to the test the best way we knew how as citizens of the smart phone age: we gave them each two minutes of our time to see if we could discover anything new. Here’s how they fared:

51 years ago today, Frederick Jay Rubin, aka Rick Rubin aka DJ Double R was born.

51 years ago today, Frederick Jay Rubin, aka Rick Rubin aka DJ Double R was born.